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Worship, Discipleship, & Church History

April 10, 2017
Photo: Ryan Daly

Photo: Ryan Daly

YOKOHAMA, JAPAN—Every year, our International Apostolic Team (IAT), which includes regional leaders from all over the Every Nation world, gathers together to fellowship, pray, and plan for the coming years (and even decades). Every Nation Church Yokohama hosted our 2017 IAT meeting.

One of our conversation topics last week was liturgy and how we can equip our pastors to think critically (and even creatively) about the relationship between worship and discipleship. Working as we do in so many different cultural contexts, we recognized the need to better equip our missionaries and church planters to think through how worship works in general and how it works in their particular context.

One of our starting points was a discussion about the role of different liturgical practices in church history.

When we look back through history, we find that though the core elements of Christian worship have remained consistent (fellowship, singing, preaching, communion, offering), different elements are emphasized at different times.

For example, in medieval Europe, the climax of the liturgy was communion. Services still featured singing, fellowship, preaching, and offering, but the greater emphasis was on the celebration of the Lord’s table. In Reformation Germany, the emphasis shifted back toward the preached word. Again, the other elements of Christian worship were still present, but the shape of Protestant liturgy emphasized the importance of the preaching. Fast forward another 500 years to the Charismatic movement of the 1960s and 70s. Though Charismatic churches valued the preached word and the celebration of communion, their worship services emphasized singing and experiencing God’s presence during longer worship.

Today, if you were to attend churches with roots in these three traditions, you would still notice the different points of emphasis in the worship. Though some people would argue that one worship tradition or style is better than another, it’s more helpful to realize that in every time and place, pastors and leaders have adjusted or emphasized elements of the liturgy in response to three impulses: missiological context, theological tradition, and practical necessity. Let’s look at those reasons.

1. Missiological Context. Medieval catholicism, for all its faults, emphasized certain very visual liturgical practices (like communion) because church leaders were communicating the gospel to highly illiterate European populations—many of whom (at least initially) did not speak the same language as their priests. Hence, the emphasis on communion, a highly visual liturgical practice that powerfully represents the core truths of the gospel to people who can’t read (or maybe can’t even understand the sermon).

2. Theological Tradition. Protestant churches during the Reformation, because of their theological emphasis on Sola Scriptura, felt that the preaching of the Word needed to be the main focus of corporate worship. Though they appreciated the ways that other liturgical practices, like communion, gave worshippers a visual representation of the gospel, they felt that the Word of God had too often been absent from medieval worship practices, resulting in disciples whose knowledge of the gospel was real but underdeveloped.

3. Practical Necessity. During the Charismatic movement, many pastors and leaders (who were part of mainline cessationist denominations) were kicked out of their churches for their insistence on the continuing work of the Holy Spirit. Thus, out of both practical necessity and a theological conviction about the continued work of the Holy Spirit in the life of the church, Charismatic churches—and their particular liturgy—were birthed. While valuing the preached word, this tradition places a great emphasis on sung worship, with the expectation that people will encounter the living God in profound and unique ways as we come into His presence with singing.

As you think about liturgy and your own missiological context, remember that worship is not primarily about what we can do for God; it is about what God does in us by the Holy Spirit as we gather in His presence.

Leadership / Uncategorized

Leadership is… Multiplying (Part 5)

March 31, 2017

The Multiplication Challenge

MANILA—How are leaders made?

Are they formed organically through a combination of life experiences, or are they developed intentionally at the hands of other leaders?

Though life experiences (and even more importantly God’s providence) do play into any given leader’s leadership development, I would still argue that leadership development must be intentional.

Leaders don’t just happen organically.

If you’re uncomfortable with the idea of an intentional leadership-development strategy, you might want to ask yourself why. It sounds very spiritual to say that we’ll just make disciples and leadership development will take care of itself organically. The problem is that “organic leaders,” like unicorns and Santa Claus, only exist in an imaginary world.

Discipleship is the obvious starting point of spiritual leadership. Disciples are the raw materials out of which we can shape leaders. Our primary objective is to make disciples—to help people follow Jesus, fish for people, and enjoy fellowship with other believers. But if we stop there—if we intentionally make disciples and don’t intentionally train leaders—our growth will either plateau, or it will crush our current leaders. Healthy discipleship growth will always threaten to overwhelm current leaders and leadership structures. The only way to solve this problem is to either stop growing or train and empower new leaders.

The Apostle Paul showed a serious commitment to training and empowering future leaders in both his writings and his lifestyle, always bringing young leaders along with him on his missionary journeys. Perhaps Paul’s most well-known disciple was Timothy, a young man from Lystra who traveled with him extensively and eventually become the leader of the church in Ephesus.

Part of Timothy’s leadership development happened as he accompanied Paul on missionary trips. When we first meet Timothy in Lystra (Acts 16), he is described as “a disciple” with a Jewish mother and a Greek father. At that point, he was not a leader; he was simply a disciple. That’s the starting point of all biblical leadership.

The next thing we know, young Timothy is traveling with Paul all over the world on church-planting mission trips. I’m sure Paul appreciated Timothy’s company, but I think that main point was to upgrade Timothy’s leadership through a mobile frontline internship.

While we don’t know all the details of Timothy’s leadership training under Paul, we do get some sense of the things that Paul was trying to impress upon Timothy as a young leader when we read Paul’s letters to Timothy (1 & 2 Timothy). In these fascinating letters, Paul gives Timothy some advice about pastoring the church in Ephesus, and reminds him of some of the things he had taught him in the past.

In both letters, we see a recurring phrase that illustrates Paul’s intentionality in Timothy’s leadership development: “By the Holy Spirit who dwells within us, guard the good deposit entrusted to you”(2 Timothy 1:14; see also 1 Timothy 6:20).

Those “good deposits” that Paul speaks of don’t come to people naturally. They don’t come from random life experiences, or even reading leadership books or blogs. They only come when someone entrusts them to us; when someone takes the time to develop us as leaders.
Note: This blog was adapted from my new book, The Multiplication Challenge. For more discussion on leadership and multiplication, check out chapter 5, entitled, “How to Multiply Like a Leader.”

Leadership

Leadership Is…Communication (Part 4)

March 13, 2017

Pulpit-web-version-1024x682AUGUSTA, GA—Had a great time speaking this weekend at In Focus Church, our Every Nation church in Augusta, Georgia.
 
I’ll never forget my first public speech.

It was the summer of 1971. I was twelve years old. The Little League Baseball season was over, and it was time for the awards banquet. The morning of our team banquet, my dad (who was also our team coach) asked me to give a brief after-dinner speech on behalf of the team. I was so terrified, I hardly ate that night.

My speech contained exactly eight words and lasted less than five seconds. I had planned to say more than eight words, but I froze.

Here’s what I said: “I just want to thank the coaches, and…”

As soon as I uttered the word “and,” my brain quit functioning. I could not remember what I was supposed to say next, so I stood there and said nothing. As this long awkward silence engulfed the room and the whole Little League season, I wanted to disappear. But that didn’t happen, so I eventually sat down, and made an inward vow to never speak in public again.

But God’s leadership call on my life required that I break my childhood vow of silence.

Leaders, no matter where they are on the leadership journey, must continually grow. They need to grow in their understanding of their calling. They need to grow in their compassion for others. And they need to grow in their communication skills.

If you have a heart to lead (meaning calling and compassion), then you must be committed to continually upgrading your communication. This includes teaching, preaching, writing, blogging, and even tweeting.

Why?

Because leaders cannot lead by example only. They must communicate vision and mission to their team and those who are following them. No matter who or where you’re called to lead, your leadership calling will require that your communication skills constantly grow. The communication skills required to lead a new church plant are not the same as those required to lead a large multi-site church. And the communication skills required to lead a small department are not the same as those required to lead a large organization.

It’s obvious from the embarrassing story above that I possess no natural public-speaking talent. I’m more of a natural-born listener and observer. For me, learning to speak in public required a lot of hard work and a lot of practice. I knew this area of my life needed to develop if I was to be the leader God called me to be, so I did everything in my ability to grow and become a better communicator. After thirty-five years as a pastor, teacher, and writer, I’m still learning and changing, and hopefully getting better.

Whether you’re a seasoned preacher and teacher, or an emerging leader who has a secret vow of silence, never stop growing in this area. Never stop stretching. Leadership requires good communication, so we, as leaders, need to grow as communicators.

NOTE: This blog was adapted from my new book, The Multiplication Challenge. For more discussion on leadership and service, check out Chapter 4, entitled, “How to Grow Like a Leader.”

Blog / Leadership

Leadership Is…Listening (Part 3)

March 6, 2017

Abraham Lincoln

This blog is the third post in a five-part series on leadership called “Leadership Is…” To read more, check out the first and second posts.

NASHVILLE — During his presidency (1861-65), Abraham Lincoln frequently opened the White House to anyone who wanted to present an idea or express an opinion. While Lincoln certainly did not agree with every opinion offered, he listened, always trying to learn something new. Lincoln credited what he called his “public-opinion baths” with helping him to stay in touch with the people he was elected to lead. He constantly asked for the opinions and ideas of random people whom he met along the way, resulting in a flood of letters from average citizens to the White House. Lincoln was a great leader, in part, because he was a great listener.

Scripture is clear that leaders must be listeners (see Proverbs 12:15 for example), but with so many voices shouting so many different messages, it’s important to establish which voices matter the most. I’ve found it helpful to intentionally listen to various voices, especially when they don’t agree with me. Here are five voices that every wise leader should listen to:

1. Leaders. When we are young and new to ministry, it’s easy to find leaders and mentors, and it’s easy to listen to them. The longer we’re in ministry, and the higher we climb the leadership ladder, the more intentional we must be about seeking leaders and mentors to speak into our lives. Bottom line: leaders need to listen to leaders.

2. Peers. I have often asked my lifelong friends to correct, adjust, and balance me any time they feel I’m even slightly off. If not for honest friends, there’s no telling how many bad decisions I would have made. Also, without faithful friends, I would have gone through much of my life with a bad attitude. All leaders need a group of friends who know and love them enough to speak the truth without worrying about offense.

3. Followers. If we want to lead people, we must be willing to listen to them. And if we want to equip and empower emerging leaders, we must be willing to give them a seat at the table. Do you create the kind of culture where your followers and emerging leaders can put their ideas on the table? Do you take their ideas seriously? Victories are waiting for the humble leader who will dare to listen to wisdom from unexpected places.

4. Critics. This is perhaps the most difficult voice to hear, especially when your critics are exaggerating or making personal attacks. I don’t hate my critics, but I usually hate listening to them. When critics speak, blog, or tweet, I remind myself to ask God to help me hear the truth, even if it is not spoken in love. When faced with criticism, secure leaders listen and respond with wisdom.

5. The Holy Spirit. Though the voice of God is the most important, it is often the most difficult voice to hear. Many times I wish God would speak louder. But since He rarely yells, I realize that I need to create a quiet environment if I really want to hear him. Also, I need to remember that he often speaks through the voices of leaders, peers, followers, and even critics.

In the end, listening is all about pursuing wisdom. Listening leaders recognize that they don’t have all the answers and that they need wisdom from those around them. It is often this single factor that makes the difference between wise and foolish leaders—between success and failure as a leader.

As the writer of Proverbs 12:15 makes clear, “The way of a fool is right in his own eyes, but a wise man listens to advice.”

NOTE: This blog was adapted from my new book, The Multiplication Challenge. For more discussion on leadership and service, check out chapter 3, entitled, “How to Listen Like a Leader.”

 

 

Blog / Leadership

Leadership Is NOT… (Part 2)

February 27, 2017

Dwight Schrute

This blog is the second post in a five-part series on leadership called “Leadership Is…” To read more, check out the first and third posts.

NASHVILLE—Last week, we opened up this short series on leadership with the crucial question: “What is leadership?”

If the teachings of Jesus (especially in Mark 10) can clarify for us what leadership is (hint: serving); then maybe Dwight Schrute can help us understand what leadership is not.

For those of you not familiar with the popular television show, “The Office,” one of the central characters is a very ambitious and relationally clueless employee named Dwight. His greatest ambition in life is to be a loyal employee of Dunder Mifflin, a small paper company, and to eventually replace his boss, Michael Scott, as the Regional Manager of Dunder Mifflin’s small Scranton office.

Since Michael enjoys Dwight’s loyalty and above-and-beyond service, he creates a title for Dwight: “Assistant to the Regional Manager.” However, all throughout the show, Dwight regularly drops the preposition “to” and simply refers to himself as the “Assistant Regional Manager.” This is usually when Michael is gone, and Dwight is trying to pull rank on his colleagues in the office. As one might expect, no one is ever persuaded to follow Dwight’s lead when he starts his sentences with “As assistant regional manager, I order you to…” In fact, Dwight’s power grabs are alway countered with sarcasm and never taken seriously by his co-workers at the office.

Why?

Because leadership is not position or title.

Some of the best leaders I have met over the years did not (at least at the time) have a leadership position or title in the organization that they were serving. But they acted like leaders anyway. It’s not that they were presumptuous or insubordinate. What made them leaders was that they took initiative to serve and solve problems, and others saw their example and decided to follow.

Do you want to be a leader?

Then take initiative and start serving. Lead by example and others will follow. It’s that simple. You will never become a leader if you wait for someone to give you a title, a salary, a budget, a staff, an office, and a website.

You can start leading wherever you are right now.

NOTE: This blog was adapted from my new book, The Multiplication Challenge. For more discussion on leadership and service, check out Chapter 2, entitled, “How to Act Like a Leader.”

Blog / Book / Leadership

Leadership Is… (Part 1)

February 20, 2017

Fill in the Blank

This blog is the first post in a five-part series on leadership called “Leadership Is…” To read more, check out the second and third posts.

DUBAI—Complete this sentence: “Leadership is … ”

What word did you put in the blank?

Influence? Power? Responsibility? Authority? Position?

I imagine that unless we’re all reading the same leadership book at the same time, this fill-in-the-blank statement will yield a number of different responses—some helpful and others not so helpful; some accurate and others flawed.

When Jesus defined leadership to his disciples, he put it this way:

You know that those who are considered rulers of the Gentiles lord it over them, and their great ones exercise authority over them. But it shall not be so among you. But whoever would be great among you must be your servant (diakonos), and whoever would be first among you must be slave (doulos) of all. For even the Son of Man came not to be served but to serve, and to give his life as a ransom for many. (Mark 10:42-45)

In Jesus’ day, most people would have completed the sentence this way: “Leadership is authority.” That’s how the Romans did it. And that’s how many Jews in Jesus’ day thought about leadership (including his own disciples). To them, leadership was all about getting people to serve you.

Jesus claimed the exact opposite.

He argued that leadership is all about serving others. In fact, Jesus said that whoever wants to lead well needs to think and act like a servant.

This is what he told James and John when they asked him if they could sit at his right and left hand in heaven (Mark 10:35-37). They were looking for position and authority, and Jesus was trying to tell them that they had missed the point.

I think we often miss the point as well when we teach this story from the Bible. I can’t tell you how many times I’ve heard pastors (including myself) explain this text by saying, “You see here, Jesus doesn’t rebuke James and John for wanting to be great, but rather, He redefines greatness by saying that we must become servants.”

What’s wrong with that explanation? Well, nothing really. But here’s what’s often implied by the pastor and understood by the listener in this illustration: service is the pathway to leadership. If you serve, then you’ll become great. Serve today, so that one day, you’ll lead.

In other words, service is the means, and leadership is the end.

As good as that sounds, it’s not what Jesus was saying. In fact, it’s the exact opposite of what Jesus was trying to teach His disciples.

Jesus makes it clear that He came to serve. Serving and saving sinful humanity was an end in itself—not a means to leadership and greatness. For Jesus, leading was a means to serve. Not vice versa. When correcting the way the disciples thought about leadership, service, and greatness, Jesus suggested that their desire for greatness looked a lot like the desires of the oppressive Roman leaders of the day, wanting leadership for the sake of leadership. The disciples were thinking like people who grasp position and authority not to serve others, but to have others serve them.

What motivates you as a leader? Do you look more like Jesus, or James and John (in Mark 10)?

Over the next few weeks, we will explore what biblical leadership looks like, and think about how we can all lead more like Jesus.

[NOTE: This blog was adapted from my new book, The Multiplication Challenge. For further discussion on leadership and service, check out Chapter 1, entitled, “How to Think Like a Leader.”]

Blog / Church / Leadership

9 Tips for Young Preachers

February 6, 2017

pulpit-web-versionSAGADA, PHILIPPINES—The pastor of a large church recently asked me if I would be willing to provide sermon coaching to help his youth pastor. After a couple of phone conversations about ministry and preaching, I sent a stream-of-conscience email to the fledgling preacher that included nine somewhat random preaching tips.

1. INTRO. Concerning a sermon introduction, shorter is always better. Get to the text as fast as you can. Long introductions are rarely helpful, and often become a distraction. Move all non-essential stories, words, ideas from the intro, and if those stories, words, or ideas deserve to be in the sermon, you can always insert them after reading the text.

2. READ. While preaching, never speed-read your text, or shorten it by only reading a small portion. Read the whole text with passion, pauses, emotion, energy, and emphasis—with no comments until you finish reading the whole text. Let the text speak. Approach the reading of the text as the most important part of the sermon.

3. TEXT. After reading the text, preach the text. Stay in the text. Go deep in the text. Make sure everything you say is coming from the text. Remember that life-changing power is in His word, not in your words.

4. CONTEXT. Do not bore your audience with contextual trivia. While explaining the context is necessary, resist the temptation to say everything you now know about ancient Middle Eastern food, geography, and religion.  Delete every context comment that does not directly contribute to the your main point. Leave it on the editing floor, or save it for another message.

5. STOP. Prepare how you will stop your sermon, and plan to stop five minutes before your time limit. A rushed ending is not a good ending, so make sure you plan plenty of time to end properly.

6. HEART. It is more important for people to catch God’s heart about the text/topic than to remember your points. If they catch God’s heart, they will be transformed. If they remember your points, well, they actually won’t remember them, so focus on the heart.

7. LOVE. Effective preaching requires more than properly exegeting a text, it also demands a proper exegesis of the culture and community. In other words, good preaching requires loving the Bible and loving the people listening. Don’t preach until you are certain that you actually know, understand, love, and care for the people who will hear your sermon. Preaching is supposed to be a “speaking the truth in love” thing, therefore love is somewhat important.

8. ACTION. When we want to move people to action, especially evangelistic action, it is better to emphasize what Christ did for us rather than what we do for Him. My favorite seminary homiletics professor said it like this, “Preachers either guilt or gospel their people to action.” Since most church people already have more than enough guilt, preachers might want to pick the gospel option.

9. AUDIENCE. God is your ultimate audience. Preach to honor Him. Do not preach to please the senior pastor, the first-time visitor, the big tither, or the know-it-all critic. The best preaching is done to please the Lord, even if no one else is pleased.

 

Blog / Leadership

What I Will Miss about President Obama

January 23, 2017

President Obama

ORLANDO—This weekend, America witnessed its forty-fourth peaceful transfer of presidential power. Over the last few weeks, the media has looked ahead at America’s future with Donald Trump as president, and they’ve looked back at Barack Obama’s legacy.

Since I am not a prophet, I will refrain from making any predictions about President Trump’s upcoming term in office. Instead, I will look back on President Obama’s time as America’s forty-fourth president.

While I disagreed with many of his policies, and while the Obama administration has championed certain “progressive” political and cultural developments that I find morally regressive and theologically problematic, I have also learned a great deal about leadership from President Obama.

Here are three leadership qualities modeled by President Obama that I wish all leaders would practice:

1. His ability to remain civil in the midst of bitter political battles. It is no secret that President Obama faced bitter opposition throughout his presidency. While every president will be criticized for their policies and decisions, many of President Obama’s critics went well-beyond the bounds of professional critique and engaged in ugly partisanship and even racist rhetoric. Despite the deafening criticism (some justified, some unjustified) he received as president, he almost always managed to remain civil and gracious toward those with whom he disagreed. He chose not to lash out at his many critics, but instead, he modeled brilliantly (at the highest stage of power!) how leaders should respond to criticism and opposition—with a soft heart and with thick skin.

2. His decision to prioritize family in the midst of the busiest job in the world. Despite the fact that he has the most demanding schedule on the planet, and despite the fact that he himself grew up without a father, President Obama prioritizes time with his children. Not only is he a devoted father, but he is also a faithful husband to his wife of twenty-five years. In an American political scene filled with scandal and extramarital affairs, it is refreshing to see a president who walks in integrity and resists the temptations that have ensnared so many men and women in elected office.

3. His efforts to ensure a smooth leadership transition to a political rival. Besides Hillary Clinton, no one in the world must be more disappointed by the recent election than Barack Obama. Not only did Donald Trump viciously criticize President Obama throughout his campaign, but he promised to reverse many of Obama’s landmark political achievements. And yet, over the last two months, Obama has made great efforts to ensure a smooth leadership transition. In a time when people in Barack Obama’s party are calling Trump’s presidency “illegitimate,” President Obama is doing to the unpopular thing and setting up his political enemy for success. This is not an easy thing to do. I’ve seen pastors undermine their successors (even ones they picked!) out of insecurity and incompetence. Passing the baton is always difficult; but passing the baton to a political rival is incredibly difficult. Established leaders would do well to watch and learn from President Obama’s example.

For these reasons I am thankful for President Obama’s leadership example, despite our political differences. I have been praying for him for the last eight years, and I will probably continue to pray for him as he transitions into new places of influence.

But now I have also begun praying for America’s newest president—that he will lead with integrity and wisdom, and that he (like the rest of us) will learn from President Obama’s example of civility, integrity, and gracious leadership.

Blog / Church / Leadership

Planning for Every Nation Theological Seminary

November 14, 2016

School classroom with school desks and blackboard in Japanese high school

NASHVILLE – Just got back from Manila this weekend, and I am looking forward to a full week in our Every Nation office in Nashville. One of my first meetings this week was with missiologist and (recently appointed) Billy Graham Professor of Church, Mission, and Evangelism at Wheaton College, Ed Stetzer. Ed has spoken at numerous Every Nation conferences and has consulted with us for many years. Today, we talked about theological education, and the future of Every Nation Theological Seminary. I loved hearing Ed’s wisdom on how to be successful at both theological education and leadership development.

Before heading into our meeting, I jotted down five words that have emerged in conversations with Every Nation leaders about what matters most for us in theological education and leadership development.

1. Missional: Our schools exist to inspire and equip people for mission. We are called to make disciples of all nations (Matthew 28:19), and our schools of ministry are designed to serve that goal. Theology and mission are inseparable. If we do theology without mission, then we engage in pointless academic exercises. If we do mission without theology, then we will drift away from the gospel as we engage the culture.

2. Global: As a global family of local churches whose goal is to reach every nation in our generation, we need to remember to be “global” in at least two ways. First, we need to teach our students how to contextualize the truths of the gospel for their target culture and language. Second, we need to remind our teachers that our students come from a wide variety of cultural and linguistic backgrounds, and our classes need to be accessible and engaging to students from every nation.

3. Practical: Though I hope that some of our students will pursue further study and become vocational theologians (and future teachers at ENTS), most of our students will become church planters, campus missionaries, and cross-cultural missionaries. We never want to lose sight of the practical implications of theological education. We are primarily training practitioners; and ultimately, all the head knowledge in the world means nothing if we can’t translate that knowledge into effective ministry practices.

4. Transformational: As a movement that believes in the present work of the Holy Spirit to transform us on the inside and empower us to witness, we believe that theological education and leadership development must go beyond the mere transfer of information. To produce students who are better informed is not enough. We want each of our students to be transformed as they engage their minds and hearts to learn about more God, the Church, and the Word.

5. Doxological: “We exist to honor God…” Those are the first five words of Every Nation’s mission statement, and they are the most important. They always will be. We hope that all of our students come out of our schools with a greater love for theology and for mission. But above all, we want to cultivate in our students a greater love for God. Ultimately, theology and mission share the same end—the glory of God. So we train leaders and send them to ends of the earth because we, like John, are captivated by the vision of “a great multitude that no one could number, from every nation, from all tribes and peoples and languages, standing before the throne and before the Lamb… and crying out with a loud voice, ‘Salvation belongs to our God who sits on the throne and to the Lamb.’” (Revelation 7:9-10)

Blog / Discipleship / Leadership / Uncategorized

My Thoughts on the Election

November 8, 2016

Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump are tightening their grips on the Democratic and Republican presidential nominations.

HO CHI MINH CITY – Tomorrow will end one of the most bizarre and polarizing election cycles in American history.

The candidates from the two leading parties are deeply unpopular (with good reason). And Evangelicals are deeply divided over how they should vote—or if they should vote at all.

Considering that the Bible has little to say about electoral politics (they didn’t have elections back then), here’s some wisdom from John Wesley:

I met those of our society who had votes in the ensuing election, and advised them, 1. To vote, without fee or reward, for the person they judged most worthy; 2. To speak no evil of the person they voted against; and 3. To take care their spirits were not sharpened against those that voted on the other side. (From The Journal of John Wesley, October 6, 1774)

Whether you will be voting tomorrow in the United States elections or voting in a highly contested election somewhere else in the world, here’s how we can take Wesley’s wise advice to heart.

1. Vote for whom you think is most worthy. A simple yet often forgotten point about voting. It’s your vote; so you decide. Don’t worry about the pundits. Don’t worry about pleasing your peers. Don’t worry about pleasing your pastor. Vote for whom you think is most worthy—whether they are a Republican, Democrat, Independent, or a write-in.

2. Speak no evil of the candidate you voted against. In an election season when most people feel that they are in fact choosing between the “lesser of two evils,” it can be tempting to justify your vote by simply describing how “evil” the other candidate is. But as Christians, we are called to a different standard. Our words, even when critiquing a candidate, need to be full of grace. And our attitude should be that of humility—recognizing that apart from God’s grace, we are no better or less sinful than even the most corrupt and morally-bankrupt candidate.

3. Do not sharpen your soul against people who voted differently than you. I can’t tell you how many times I have heard people say: “I don’t know how someone who calls themselves a Christian can vote for _______.” If you find yourself saying or thinking that, I would suggest that either your circle of friends is too small—or that you’ve spent too much time on the echo-chamber of social media, where you usually only see the newsfeeds of people who think just like you. I guarantee you that people in your local church are not all voting for the same person. Even if you’ve wrestled and prayed over your decision and feel that it is the best vote a committed Christian can make, know that other committed Christians, who have put in similar thought and prayer, will be voting for another candidate (Ed Stetzer has compiled a series of opposing viewpoints from prominent evangelicals that you can view here). Guard your heart from pride and don’t allow the vitriol and disunity of the culture to creep into the church.

As I have said to my church on many election days in the Philippines, we may have a new president; but Jesus is still King. So let’s live (and vote) like it.